Changing Cloth Diapers. Create a System that Works!

Changing Cloth Diapers. Create a System that Works!

Establishing an efficient diaper changing system is essential to your cloth diapering success. Just like settling on an effective diaper wash routine, finding an optimal diaper changing system can take some trial-and-error. Each family and household is unique. To give you some ideas, I’ll share what works for us.

In our family, cloth diapering felt very awkward at first. It took us a while to find a good routine. We finally settled on the set-up below. Here is a picture of our “diaper station”. It’s nothing fancy, but it works great because we have access to everything in one spot.

Cloth diaper changing station

Clean Diapers:

You can see our “organized mess” of clean diapers in the orange bin. I used to fold the clean diapers and lay them neatly in the box, but I’ve grown lazy. Now, I just toss them right from the dryer to the bin in a big heap. It works for us, and it seems to save us time overall.

Dirty Diapers:

We have two large hanging wet bags that we cycle between. Each holds about 20 diapers. Having two is essential, so we have a place to put the dirty diapers when one is in the wash. Our wet bags are always left unzipped. Because we do laundry every 1-2 days, it never gets too stinky. Some people prefer a diaper pail over a hanging bag. For pails (or cans/buckets), consider reusable pail liners with elastic tops. Both wet bags and pail liners can be washed right along with your diapers.

Wipes:

We often use disposable wipes, which we toss in the trash can. Sometimes we use cloth wipes, which are tossed in the wet bag with the dirty diapers.

Diaper Sprayer:

If the diaper requires rinsing, the bathroom and diaper sprayer are just around the corner.

Bucket of Goods:

Having a bin full of frequently-used items right on the changing table was incredibly helpful. Examples of such items include lotion, diaper creams, extra clothes, and swaddles. Hand sanitizer was nice to have in the event of a poopy mess, since I couldn’t leave baby on the table to go wash my hands. In the newborn stage, I also kept some snappis in this bin, which worked well for the effective Jelly Roll Fold.

Table:

Yes, that is quite literally our kitchen table. We sacrificed our dining table for a “changing station” for over a year. During that time, dinner was served on our coffee table. Before my daughter was born, I looked at several “changing tables”, but they were all small and expensive! Our dining table was free and worked well. Like I said, every family is unique in what works for them.



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